Microsoft stops selling emotion-reading technology and limits facial recognition
Microsoft stops selling emotion-reading technology and limits facial recognition

Microsoft stops selling emotion-reading technology and limits facial recognition

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Oakland, California, June 21 (Reuters) – Microsoft Corporation (MSFT.O) On Tuesday, it said it would stop selling technology that guesses a person’s emotions based on an image of their face and will no longer provide unrestricted access to facial recognition technology.

The move reflects the efforts of major cloud providers to rein in the sensitive technology themselves, as lawmakers in the United States and Europe continue to test the broad limits of the law.

Since at least last year, Microsoft has been reviewing whether the emotion recognition system has scientific roots.

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Notes

“This effort has raised important questions about privacy, the lack of consensus on the definition of ’emotion’, and the inability to generalize the relationship between facial expressions and emotional state across use cases, regions, and demographics,” said Sarah Bird, the group’s lead producer. said the Azure AI unit manager at Microsoft, in a blog post.

Existing customers will have one year before they lose access to artificial intelligence tools that claim to be able to infer feelings, gender, age, smile, facial hair, hair and makeup.

Alphabet Corporation (GOOGL.O) Google Cloud began a similar assessment last year, first reported by Reuters. Read More Google has blocked 13 striped emotions from its sentiment readers and has placed four existing emotions, such as happy and sad, under review. He was considering a new system that would describe gestures such as frowning and smiling, without trying to associate them with feelings.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment Tuesday.

Microsoft also said that customers must now obtain approval to use facial recognition services, which allow people to enter websites or open locked doors with facial scanning.

The company urges customers to avoid situations where privacy may be violated or technology may encounter difficulties, such as identifying minors, but does not explicitly prohibit such use.

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Parrish Dave reports. Edited by David Gregory

Our Criteria: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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